A Healthy Organizational Culture Strengthens Corporations


For companies to maintain a healthy organizational culture, the values and ethics of all the stakeholders must intersect. This includes the employees, managers, executives, stockholders, customers and society. Values will help employees pursue specific beliefs, behavior and ideas which align with the goals of the organization. Additionally, norms and guidelines will help to prescribe the acceptable behavior for employees to follow. All of this helps to shape the culture when experiences, education, attitudes, values and beliefs converge within the organization. The organization's culture defines the organization's reputation.

Whether or not a healthy organizational culture exists depends greatly on the type of leadership that exists within the organization. The importance of leadership should not be underestimated concerning the influence that a good leader can have on the culture. The qualities and strategies that leaders adopt for communicating the vision, mission and goals of the organization will directly impact the interpersonal relationships that ultimate shape the inner workings of that organization.

A strong organization culture will shape the work shape people's work ethics and will also involve social responsibility related to the organization's image in society. Conversely, a weak organization culture can be disruptive to meeting goals and objectives because people will challenge policies and procedures when they are not aligned with what the organization values.

A healthy organizational culture requires openness and humility of every person who is a part of the organization, from the leader to the entry level worker. There must be an environment that encourages accountability and personal accountability, not blame and excuses for behaviors. Blame and excuses only breeds conflict which will threaten the healthy culture. Employees must be encouraged to take risks that are within limits which foster learning and growth.

A healthy culture allows employees to learn from mistakes. Creativity is stifled when honest mistakes are punished. Clarity, transparency and reliability are also traits of a healthy culture which will lead to business success.

Additional Ways to Foster a Healthy Organizational Culture

Organizational leadership must constantly look for ways of improvement which prevents an organization from becoming stagnant and ineffective within its industry. A healthy culture will help ensure that this objective is met by each employee having a commitment to do what is right for the organization. Striving for excellence will prevent mediocrity. When there is dishonesty and inconsistency between words and actions, trust is hindered.

Reliable follow-through is important if healthy relationships are going to thrive. An integration of the best ideas and practices within all departments will multiply the strength of an organization.

 

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